A Child Chosen

Explaining The Adoption Process

Child Adoption And The Happiness Of Belonging To A Family

When Tammy and Drew Waltz adopted four siblings at once, reactions of joy and amusement traversed freely among family members and friends.

 

 

Thirty-one year old Tammy Waltz and her husband Drew had hosted three brothers aged 8,9 and 11 as well as their 13-year-old sister at their North Carolina home for five weeks during Christmas in 2016. Through this time, they formed a bond that made the house feel empty when the children left for Eastern Europe after the visit.

 

 

The couple video recorded their bold move asking friends and families to send a message to the kids before announcing that they would be adopting them. The children’s new great-grandma was elated and could not hide her tears of joy on the news.

 

 

Interestingly, none of the children speak English and the Waltzes use the Speak and Translate app to communicate with them. They are now waiting to for the court date to finalize the adoption.

 

 

Elsewhere, the Canadian government will pay a hefty price for illegal adoptions of indigenous children by non-native families, facilitated by social workers. This was done through an adoption program that ranged for over two decades ending in the late 1980s.

 

 

The government will pay a total of 750 million Canadian dollars to more than 30,000 affected people. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had promised that the Canadian government would improve its relationships with the indigenous people, pointing to some of the injustices committed by previous regimes.

 

 

The adaptation program had been introduced ostensibly to provide social services to indigenous children. However, without being properly equipped with the cultural aspects of the aboriginal, indigenous communities, social workers separated children from their families, some ending up in faraway places such as Europe and New Zealand.

 

 

Historically, the separation of children from their families was a system to reduce the population of the indigenous people. It was commonly known as the Sixties Scoop because the children were literary “scooped” from their families and communities.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Proudly powered by WordPress