Dealing With The Departure Of Your First Foster Child

As a licensed foster parent, it becomes very challenging trying to let go of a child you have loved and parented for a lengthy period. A greater challenge is attempting to adjust to the arrival of a new child fresh after the departure of your first foster child. Letting go of your first foster child leaves you under a great deal of mental, emotional, and physical strain. This is because you have very high expectations thinking that you will be able to adopt this child.

The strain experienced comes from the uncertainty of adopting this child, coursing through the bureaucratic red tape of a failed system, and having to say goodbye to someone who has grown to become part of your family. This means that as a foster parent, falling short in one experience can significantly drain your energy and morale. One reason that can cause your foster child to leave is if they are reunited with their biological relatives. However, when you decide to do it again, you will be more prepared to deal with the dilemma of the possible outcome.

It is essential to pick yourself up quickly because the American foster child system is never short of children who are in need of a family. Even though the departure of a foster child is accompanied by a deep sense of loss, preparing yourself emotionally will assist you to get back on your feet. Most foster parents have to be optimistic and hope that every time they take in a child, the probability of adoption is very high. This will enable you to realize that your current foster child is not there to replace or displace the previous one but to offer a new beginning.

The panic associated with meeting a new child is most likely based on the subconscious need to fill the void left by your previous foster child. However, the only way to go about this is to treat each experience separately, start afresh, and make the most out of every situation.