How to Be the Right Parent to an Adopted Teen

Adoption is a wonderful process that gives a child in need a loving home and family to call their own. Unfortunately, adopting a teenager can often be a long and difficult road, since you’re taking on the responsibilities of an older child who needs additional care, both physically and mentally. Oftentimes, teens in the foster care system are there because they have problematic histories with crime, drugs and past family calamities. Taking on an adopted teen is difficult work, but it is well worth it considering the fact that you’ll be responsible for turning that child’s life around.

 

If you’ve adopted a teenager recently and are finding that you’re experiencing problems, it might be a good idea to consider seeing a family counselor. Counselors are trained and experienced to handle a wide array of different issues, including those found in adopted families. The adoption agency will probably have a list of approved therapists who are specific to adopted families, so you might want to consider contacting the agency if you’re experiencing problems at home.

 

The key to getting along with your adopted teen is to understand what they’re going through and what their past was like. Keep in mind that you’re bringing a teen into a totally new environment that they might not like, especially if you’re a stricter family with more guidelines and rules than they’re used to following. You need to be as patient as possible with your child because this is the time they need it the most. If they require space away from you, your spouse and your other children, let them have that space and don’t force them to do anything. There is a difference between being a caring, loving and protective parent and being an overbearing one who is making life miserable for their adopted teenager. When it concerns your child, it’s all about giving the situation time in order for you all to get along and consider yourself a family.

 

Foreign Adoption Rates Decrease, Yet Parents are Still Needed

Most people know that adopting a child is not easy. The cost can be prohibitive, there may be laws that complicate the adoption if the child is coming from out of the country, and there is a risk of complications with a birth parent. Some adopted children come from homes where they’ve been abused which make it difficult for the bonding process with their adoptive family. Adoption inherently carries risk. Yet, parents still seek out a child to add to their family.

 

 

Recently, the number of foreign adoptions has dropped drastically. Some countries like Russia have enacted laws that ban parents from certain countries from adopting children from Russia. Many such policies are politically motivated. Adoption is used as a tool to punish citizens of a particular country. Other countries have laws based on ideology or religion that may ban single parents or gay couples from adopting.

 

 

Another barrier to successful adoptions is the cost. Some countries have begun to see adoption as a business. When that happens, fees can soar up to $30,000 or more, making the cost prohibitive to many potential parents. Many parents are willing to sacrifice their financial stability to bring their child home with them.

 

 

The process of adopting a child is complicated, but many loving families are still willing to go through the heart-wrenching process. Thousands of children are left orphaned each year. At the heart of the adoption process should be what is best for the children involved. Their health and welfare should be what drives the policies not political ideologies or an opportunity to make money. When governments, adoptive workers, and parents act with the best interest of the child in mind, the process can be made more bearable. Perhaps if everyone involved was able to remember that a child lies at the heart of the adoptive process, then more children could be matched with families who want them.

 

Embryo Adoption Gives Hope to Couples Seeking to Adopt Children or Dispose of Their Unused Embryos

When it comes to adoption, most people think of adopting a fully grown child. What about adopting an embryo? Well, two US couples decided to go the embryo adoption way with one as the donor and the other as the recipient of the embryo.

 

Following successful IVF treatment, the Gassmans were left wondering what to do with their leftover embryos now that they were certain they were not going to be able to carry any more children. They looked at all the options they had from destroying the embryos and donating them to scientific research before finally settling down on given them up for adoption. For the Hendersons, having unsuccessfully undergone IVF treatment, they were looking for a way of getting a child without going the traditional adoption route. When their family doctor informed them that they could adopt an embryo, they quickly jumped on the idea and were eventually matched to the Gassmans. Both couples are happy with the decision they made. Both also have the opportunity to enjoy parenthood. They have even decided to remain in touch, and their children know each other.

 

What is Embryo Adoption?

 

Embryo adoption involves implanting a donated embryo into the uterus of a woman in the same way as the implantation process used in fertility treatments for biological parents. The process is much cheaper than in vitro fertilization with a donor egg. Embryo adoption costs nearly half the cost of traditional IVF treatment with a donor egg. However, in embryo adoption, once you donate your embryo for adoption, you cannot change your mind later and insist on keeping such as during traditional adoption. Once embryos are donated, they are viewed as commodities and no longer belong to the biological parents. Consequently, if you’re not sure you want to give away your embryo, you are better off not donating it in the first place.

 

Embryo donation programs report that their process is 10% more successful than traditional in vitro treatment. The variation between the two processes is that in embryo donation, open communication is allowed between the donors and the recipients. Therefore, both parties can get to know each other in advance before making their final decision on whether to go on with the process.

 

 

 

Hill Harper Adopts A Child

Hill Harper always wanted to be a father, but he always envisioned himself doing it the traditional way. He thought that he was going to get married before he started his family. He did not plan on becoming a single father, but he is happy to be a new father.

 

Hill recently adopted an 18-month old boy named Pierce. He stated that adopting Pierce was the best decision he made in his life. He believes that fate brought him and Pierce together.

 

Hill began thinking about adoption in Spring 2015. At first, he did not think that he was ready. However, a close friend told Hill that he would make a great parent. Hill contacted an attorney who told him about the process of adoption. The attorney told him that there was a woman who was getting ready to get give birth and was looking for someone to adopt her child.

 

Pierce was born in December 2015. Hill was there when the baby was born. He also cut the umbilical cord. Hill admitted that he was afraid to adopt the baby at first. He knew that his life was going to change forever. However, the fears that he had are small compared to the joy that he has gained.

 

Even though Hill is a single father, he has a lot of help. His mother and other close relatives are helping him. He is also getting help from his girlfriend.

 

There were a lot of things that Hill did not do before he became a parent. The first time he changed a diaper was 18 months ago. However, he is slowly getting the hang of parenting. He is cherishing every moment that he spends with his son.

 

New York Times on Adjusting to Life After Adoption

The New York Times recently published a piece discussing the importance of appropriately acclamation to life following the adoption of a new child. With the rise of adoption in states like New Jersey, new information has been released regarding adaptation procedures when new children are introduced into a pre-existing family system. New parents of adoptive children should be prepared to handle family life in ways that foster the development of adopted children, allow a multitude of emotions to be shared and expressed openly, and be open to new experiences as a result of the new arrangement.

 

Processing Emotions Following the Close of Adoption Procedures

 

Adoption procedures are known to be taxing on the parents involved in the process. The grueling process involves a selection of qualities that one will and will not prefer in an adopted child, case studies where homes are scrutinized, and the procurement of enormous amounts of money to finalize the adoption. After this overwhelming process has been completed, new parents are often so relieved to have survived it that they do not adequately prepare for the new journey they are about to take once the child has entered their home. Adopted children, if they are not infants, can be nervous, anxious, or frustrated about engaging with new parents during the beginning of their new lives. These emotions combined with any nervousness the parents may feel can create very unrealistic expectations and behaviors in the home environment. Leading adoption analyst often suggest that new parents take time before the adoption procedures even begin to mentally process the gravity of the circumstance they have chosen. Although no amount of preparation can replace the actual experience of adopting a child, adequate preparation can drastically reduce unrealistic expectations and negative emotions surrounding the adoptive process.

 

Adjusting to Outside Family

New adoptive families also struggle to help extended family adjust to new family arrangements, especially if the child is of a different race or ethnicity than the original family. Experts suggest educating these family members as much as possible before the child enters the home to alleviate undue stress.

 

Bill allowing faith-based ojections to adoption placement passes Texas House

A bill that would give foster care and adoption agencies that receive state funding in the Lone Star State the ability to refuse to place children with families they disapprove of based on religious grounds — including those of same sex and transgender people – has recently been passed by the Texas House of Representatives.

 

According to an article that appeared in the New York Times (www.nytimes.com/2017/05/11/texas-adoption-bill-religous-grounds), the bill must still pass the Texas Senate. It also allows agencies to cite religious objections in denying contraception and abortion services to teenagers.

 

Those who support the measure argue that it will permit social service agencies and organizations to pursue faith based policies while protecting them from facing discrimination lawsuits, the New York Times said.

 

Among the groups applauding the passage of the measure in the House was the Texas Catholic Conference of Bishops. In a statement, the bishops said they look forward to the bill’s quick passage by the Senate.

 

If the bill passes, it would make it illegal for Texas to penalize an agency if it denies service to someone based on religious grounds. Opponents argue that the bill might unfairly potential adoptive parents who are non-Christian; those who have inter-faith marriages; those who have been divorced and remarried and atheists.

 

In 2015, a federal judge ruled that the Texas Child Protective Services Division exposed children to an unreasonable risk of harm, thereby damaging their constitutional rights. Rep. James Frank, who authored the bill, said it simply allows agencies to operate without the fear of legal reprisals.

 

Opponents of the measure say it would make a child’s path to adoption more difficult by taking away the ability of gay and transgender people to adopt.

 

About 22,000 children in Texas are awaiting foster home placement. Both Alabama and South Dakota have passed similar laws.

 

 

Is Adoption The Right Option for You?

Being the parent of an adopted child can be difficult, but it is well worth it considering the fact that you’re giving a child a beautiful and loving home that they can feel comfortable living in. The problem that many parents face is the often grueling process involved with adopting a child. It can take years and tens of thousands of dollars just to adopt one child, whether you’re doing so in your home country or in another country altogether. This is a price that a lot of parents simply cannot afford, so it’s not the right option for just anyone who wants to adopt a kid.

 

When you make the decision to adopt, your first step is to work with a local adoption agency to find the right fit. Don’t be surprised if you and your partner are examined from top to bottom to ensure that you’re good parents for an adopted child. This means that the agency will look at your finances, jobs, savings accounts, health screenings, psych evaluations and criminal records just to make sure that you’ll make good parents. There is a lot more that goes into adopting a child than goes into having babies naturally, which is often a shame because most parents won’t adopt because of the strict regulations.

 

However, if you’re able and willing to go through the process, adoption is a beautiful option for many families who want to add to their household. It’s a great choice for infertile couples who simply cannot have children on their own. It’s also perfect for parents who already have kids but want to adopt because they would like to help save homeless babies and children. If you’d like to adopt an older child, there are many kids and teens in the foster care system who are all looking for loving homes. This is another option for those who want to go through the adoption process and help kids who are in need.

 

Intercountry Adoption Rates Falling Globally

Global rates of intercountry adoption, adopting children from other countries, are taking a nosedive, according to Peter Selman, expert in intercountry adoption who works for Newcastle University.

 

Since 2004, the numbers have dropped by more than 200 each and every week. They’ve halved since 2004. Italy has managed to maintain its adoption numbers, being the only country in Europe to do so.

 

One of the key factors playing a role is strict US adoption laws, which allow US birth mothers to choose their adoptive parents. They are far more likely to choose an American over someone from another country.

 

Another factor is the 1993 Hague Convention, which is set up to guard against abuses and further regulate intercountry adoption. Countries that sign up have to follow strict guidelines that may include passing on adoption requests from certain countries it would have previously approved. Ireland signed up for the convention in 2010, which adds another western country to the list.

 

Prospective parents in Ireland looking to adopt now can’t look for children in many of the countries that would have previously been considered and now have to look to countries like the US, which as mentioned previously, doesn’t often ship their children out of country.

 

It’s also possible that these numbers are just tied with declining birth rates. As the adult working population spends more time at work, the desire to have children goes down. Couples that may have previously been interested are no longer interested, especially with the mounds of paperwork and time it takes just to get approved for an adoption these days.

 

There are also scientific advancements in fertility treatments. Couples that may not have been able to previously have children can now in some cases find success. All of these factors can contribute to these declining rates, and it doesn’t seem that they will soon make a recovery.

 

Are Governments Placing Restrictions on International Adoption

Adoptive parents face many barriers to a successful and mutually beneficial adoption process, including the enormous amount of money required to finalize the adoption. Many Americans are struggling to determine why international adoptions have become almost three times more expensive than domestic adoption. In a recent New York Times article, a contributor discusses the possibility that foreign governments are adding undue and unnecessary restrictions to the foreign adoptive process in an effort to limit the number of children adopted to other countries.

 

 

There are an estimated 140 million orphans currently living in the world with thousands of new children being orphaned on a daily basis. People with generous hearts who wish to alleviate this world wide problem are often met with hurdles that should not exist in the adoption process. While an adoption should, in ideal terms, consist of a legally binding agreement between two or more persons transferring the rights to the child from one parent or governing body to another, it is often a process riddled with difficulties.

 

Government officials in several countries including the United States and Canada have been attempting to limit the interference that some governments have in the international adoption process. Many governments limit these adoptions in hopes that the children born in these countries will be educated as citizens of these countries. This way, these countries can benefit on the productivity of both natural citizens and orphans alike. Several members of the United Nations have argued that this position is cruel and is not considerate of the well being of orphaned children. While many parents in wealthy nations would like to use their considerable resources to care for orphaned children, legal red tape and endless stipulations often prevent them from doing so.

 

As a response to the legislation passed by countries like China to place limits on international adoption, UN officials have developed an international effort to pair orphans with supportive families from around the world who desire to adopt internationally.

 

Interesting Ways to Raise Money For Adoption

A recent Forbes article discussed interesting new ways that adoptive parents could raise the money to pay for adoption procedures. Even as adoption increases in popularity in the United States, the costs associated with the process increase faster. Perspective adoptive families must pay attorney’s legal fees, fees for home studies, domestic infant adoption costs, private agency costs, inter adoptive agency costs, and a host of other costs depending specifically on the type of adoption occurring. The legal hurdles and unplanned events in an adoption can cause the rate to skyrocket past the already expensive standard that already exists. In response to the these costs, many Americans have had to come up with creative ways to raise the money for adoption.

 

Budgeting With a Vengeance

The term, “super budgeting” is used to described the intense way that many couples cut out excessive spending in order to save for adoption. Couples have moved out of apartments and into tiny homes in an effort to avoid expensive monthly rental rates and put the saved income toward adoption fees. One couple, the Morts of Pennsylvania, saved over 20 thousand dollars annually and placed it toward their adoption fees.

 

Picking Up Odd Jobs

Another couple seeking to adopt in Wyoming made headlines for picking up odd jobs for eight years before earning enough to pay for adoption. Jobs that can boost income are often available and the extra effort in completing them could all but pay for the adoption process. It has actually become frequent for perspective adoptive families to develop side businesses to fund adoption.

 

Accept Donations

With the increase in popularity of crowdfunding sites like Go Fund Me, families have also been raising money for adoption through the intake of donations. The Beverlys of Minnesota raised 30 thousand dollars for the adoption of their youngest daughter by creating a crowdfunding account. These sites can be extremely beneficial for families and can allow money to be saved for the actual raising of the child.