Delilah Getting Ready to Adopt Her 14th Child

Delilah, who is a radio show host, is now back on the air. She took a break after her son, Zack, passed away last fall. She stated that losing Zack was hard, but it did bring the family closer together. She also stated that her daughter found out that she was pregnant before Zack died.

This is the second child that Delilah has lost in the past five years. Her son Sammy died from sickle cell anemia in 2012. Zack committed suicide after a long battle with depression. A listener asked Delilah about books that they should read in order to cope with the loss of a child. She stated that there was not any book that could help.

Delilah also stated that the suggestions that people make have not helped her. She stated that being there for someone is the only thing that can help. Delilah is getting ready to adopt her 14th child. She had three biological children and 10 adopted.

There are 487,000 children who are in foster care. Only 5 percent of these children will have a forever home. She stated that adoption has been a blessing because many of the children would not have a home. She also stated that raising her children has been her world.

Delilah has given some advice that can help people who are going through a difficult ordeal. She stated that no one should go through life sweating the small things. She stated that when you sweat the small things, you take the joy out of living. Delilah’s show comes on The Sound 94.1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. She also has a show from 7 p.m. to 12 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.

The Biracial Word Of Adoption

The Adoption Of The First Child

Recently, splinternews.com Splinternews.com did an article about a young couple that decided to make the decision to adopt children. Meg St-Esprit is a freelance writer who lives in Pittsburgh. She and her husband decided that they wanted to find their own religion. They went on a search for God, and they found a church that they really loved. After getting acquainted with the members of the church, St-Esprit and her husband began the process of adopting their first child. Their son was a local blue-eyed, blond haired boy. All of the members of the church were happy for the family. The church members congratulated them , cried with them, hugged them, and made Meg St-Esprit and her husband feel like heroes for adopting such a beautiful child.

 

Adopting Black Children

Meg St-Esprit wrote an article about the different experience that she and her husband had after adopting adopting two black children. St-Esprit felt like the members of her church had rejected her black babies, and she was very surprised that many of them showed racist attitudes. It was something that she never realized because she is a white woman herself who does not have a prejudice bone in her body. Because of so many racist comments that were directed towards her children, St-Esprit and her husband decided to move to a new area. The family also found a new accepting church.

 

My Take On The Experience

The experience of Megan St-Esprit and her husband is deeply saddening and also moving. It shows that there are many people who are hiding racist feelings, but it also shows that people like Meg St-Esprit and her husband exist as well. They are amazing people who truly do not see race; they only see love and hope. It is wonderful to read a story about people who are so open and loving. I hope that St-Esprit and her family find peace in their new church and acceptance in their new location.

What It Takes to Adopt a Child and Parent a Kid

Being a parent is one of the most difficult undertakings in the world today. One thing you need to know is that this process does not come with a guide and there is actually no right or wrong way to go about this. While this is true, it’s equally true to note that this process gets even harder when adopting and raising an adopted child, nonetheless it can be managed.

Since time immemorial, parents have been adopting children and this process has been nothing short of a roller coaster of mixed emotions and paper burden. However, thanks to the vast wealth of experience having adopted a kid on my own, I seek to make this process less bearable to anyone involved. This said however, I must caution anybody planning to adopt a child that due diligence and getting to know the process. While the adoption process may vary from one family to another below are some of the basics you need to familiarize with.

Decide to adopt

Child adoption can be quite rewarding if you get your footing right in the process. While this is true, this miracle can also cause you your family. Therefore before you get into the process ensure that you are right to adopt and that adopting a kid is healthy to your family. You will have to consult your family on this.

Research and choose an adoption

Research is your best friend when it comes to adopting a child. Get to understand the legalities and what type of adoption will suit you and your family. Doing this will help you avoid the many avoidable hiccups in the future.

Adopting and raising a child can be tricky but with the right kind of help all will. Use the above tips to get started.

Canada’s Government Seeks to Restore Relationships After Adoption Decisions

A recent post by the New York Times revealed that the Canadian government is attempting to restore proper relationships with the country’s native populations. The country has a history of injustice toward its native people, and are seeking to restore relationships following the government’s 1960s decision to remove indigenous children from their reservations and put them up for adoption by non-native families. The decision came as a result of Westward expansion and, according to the New York Times, has impacted thousands of families that are native to the Americas. The decision to resettle native children, colloquially known as the the Sixties Swoop, is now being recognized across Canada as a catastrophe that should be accounted for.

The efforts to eradicate the result of the adoptions that took place during the sixties began about a decade ago when the Canadian government made official apologetic statements regarding the Sixties Swoop. In 2008, the Canadian government implemented a class action settlement that would pay out at least 750 million dollars to families that were negatively affected by the widespread adoption process. According to the New York Times, many individuals who were adopted during this time or who had their children forcibly removed from their households have come forth to discuss the implications the adoption process had on their livelihoods.

Several adults who were removed from their homes during the Canadian Sixties Swoop discussed their upbringing and the cultural effect of the removal. Nancy Hodges, a woman who was 6 years old when she was removed from her family in 1962 and placed in the adoptive care of a white family, stated that the effects of her removal were catastrophic and lasting. She stated that although her adoptive parents were kind and caring, she loved and dearly missed her biological parents and reconnected with them during her late teen-aged years. Nancy recounted several stories of family events that she missed during her time living with her adoptive parents and has always been disheartened at the fact that she missed time with her father before his death when she was 19.